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Resources NOGOE documentation

Resources NOGOE documentation – 22 October 2009, LOCOG on the rack press release”Results of a survey of Greenwich residents carried out by London Assembly member, Gareth Bacon, showed that 68% of respondents were opposed to the Equestrian Olympics in Greenwich Park (see Daily Telegraph, 20/10/09).

A similar pattern was observed by NOGOE in their collection of protest signatures outside the Park gates.

An analysis of a sample of 13,000 protesters’ addresses showed that 80% were from SE1-SE28 and Bromley and Beckenham postcodes, ie many Southeast Londoners don’t want these events in Greenwich Park – proving that opposition is NOT down to nimby-ism.

10 September 2009, Brief for Treasury and for Shadow Ministers, September 2009: Cost savings available by moving equestrian events in 2012 Olympics from Greenwich ParkIllustration of the potential cost savings to be made by moving the 2012 equestrian events to a site where there are already some existing facilities and where a positive legacy could be created: totalling around £50 million, including both financial and social costs.

9 December 2009, Daily Telegraph, London Editor.”Parts of Greenwich park will be closed to the public for five and a half years as part of controversial works to stage Olympic horseriding events, it has emerged.

The planning application, published yesterday, shows that closure of parts of the park will begin in “spring 2010,” in around five months’ time, and the grassland will not be fully restored and reopened until “November 2015.”

“4 December 2009, greenwich.co.uk, open letter to MP Nick Raynsford”Dear Nick, NOGOE very much regrets your uncritical cheer leading for LOCOG (most recently displayed in your interview with www.greenwich.co.uk).

As a constituency MP, we feel that you should respect, even if you don’t always agree with, the genuinely held views of all your constituents.

I am therefore writing this open letter to you, which the blog site has agreed to publish.”

10 November 2009, Docklands24 “Park protestors take signatures to Downing Street””Gordon Brown and Boris Johnson have both received boxes containing 13,000 signatures against the Olympic Games in Greenwich Park.”

21 October 2009, greenwich.co.uk & (20 October 2009) Daily Telegraph”HIGHLY-controversial plans to hold the Olympic horse events in Greenwich Park are opposed by almost 70 per cent of local residents, the first full-scale survey has found.

The survey, by the London Assembly, is a serious blow to the Olympic organisers”

20 October 2009, Daily Telegraph” When my three Californian nieces came to London last summer, where did I take them for a grand day out?

To Greenwich Park, of course, a place which is so steeped in history – as an important royal palace since the 14th century, birthplace of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I and Mary I – that even jaded Old Worlders must bow down in wonderment.

From the vantage point of the Royal Observatory, one can spy a glistening ensemble of white neoclassical buildings – Inigo Jones’s seminal Queen’s House and Christopher Wren’s magnificent Old Naval College – all held in the sylvan embrace of Greenwich Park, with the sparkling Thames flowing behind.

But now there are concerns that the fabric and integrity of Greenwich Park is threatened by plans to use it for the equestrian and pentathlon events in the 2012 London Olympics.”

2 October 2009, “Piloti” column, Private Eye”As the Olympic Games approach and the cost of this gratuitous nightmare for London rises, the mayor, to his credit, has said that: ‘Too much attention is being paid to the will of international sports federations and not enough to the people of London'”

6 October 2009, Evening Standard”Coe is on record as saying that the Games will deliver ‘a profit’. Perhaps his salary should come out of it.

Any student of the Olympic Games knows that there is never a legacy. As Sydney and Athens showed, the Olympics never lead to a tourism surge.

In 2012 Stratford, given its location, will be half empty and many London hotels unfilled.

All London has is a ‘legacy czar’, imported from Pennsylvania at the exorbitant fee of £200,000 a year.

His remit from the Government is, hilariously, ‘to dampen expectation’.

Sally Elliott

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